JUMP Cable Is The Right Smartphone Charger For Forgetful People

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jumpcable Like many other users, the battery on my iPhone tends to die right before the end of the day. One obvious solution is to use a case like the Mophie, but I don’t like increasing the size of my phone. Another is to carry a battery charger around with me, but unfortunately, I am just too dunderheaded to remember an extra device. Read More

Startup Mentors — How Do You Filter Out The Good, The Bad And The Ugly?

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mentors (1) In light of the recent brouhaha over the actions of a particular European investor who had a habit of attaching himself to accelerators as a ‘mentor’, it seems an appropriate time to do a quick rundown on the kinds of things entrepreneurs need to look for in genuine potential mentor to them and their companies. Because, in case you have been hiding under a rock, there a lot of… Read More

AnandTech founder Anand Shimpi retires from journalism to join Apple

See the original posting on The Verge

If you’ve built your own PC at any time over the past decade and a half, chances are you’ll have come across AnandTech in the course of your research. Founded by a precocious teenager way back in 1997, the tech news site has grown from covering motherboards and other PC components to offering some of the most in-depth technical analyses of mobile devices today. Widely respected for his enormous experience and expertise, the site’s founder and editor Anand Lal Shimpi revealed over the weekend that he was retiring from technology journalism, and now his next destination has been revealed: Apple Inc.

An Apple representative has confirmed the hire for Recode, though there’s predictably little information to go on beyond the fact that one of…

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Microsoft Continues Its Campaign Against A US Warrant Demanding Overseas Data

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microsoft-earnings A search warrant commanding Microsoft to turn over certain customer email data that is currently stored overseas was unfrozen late this week. The company declined to comply. In a statement, Microsoft said that it “will not be turning over the email and plans to appeal.” This protest act by Microsoft, arguing that domestic warrants should not be able to command access to data… Read More

Apple’s New Spaceship HQ Doesn’t Look Like A Spaceship Yet, But It’s Huge

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Screenshot 2014-08-31 18.20.40 Apple’s new spaceship-style campus is one of the last things on the company’s mind right now, with the iPhone launch looming just over the horizon. However, that hasn’t stopped some curious folks from peeking around over at the construction site. YouTuber jmcminn has captured video on a GoPro Hero 3+ using a Phantom 2 drone, and the end result shows us the foundation of… Read More

This Labor Day, Reflect On Diversity And The Future

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5049340990_4a026d1bdd_o 2014 is the year that work became a central point of discussion in Silicon Valley. For the engineers and knowledge workers in the region, issues of diversity and inclusion finally got their turn in the limelight, forcing us to question our deeply-held views about the meritocracy of Silicon Valley. We also had to confront news that several of our most iconic technology companies conspired to… Read More

‘Dota 2’ is on the front page of today’s New York Times

See the original posting on The Verge

If anyone is still questioning the legitimacy of e-sports, today should be a bit of a wake up call. The lead photo on the front page of today’s New York Times is of this July’s $10 million Dota 2 tournament, The International. That’s right: The Gray Lady has taken note, running a story on the rise of e-sports on the front page of its Sunday edition. The accompanying article is the first in a series exploring how competitive video gaming has developed into a spectator sport. The Times certainly isn’t the first big media company to pay attention to e-sports: ESPN broadcast a preview of The International on its one of its cable channels, and, of course, Amazon just purchased Twitch for $970 million. Even with all of this attention, however,…

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Last night on ‘Doctor Who:’ journey to the center of a Dalek

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For this season of The Doctor, Ross and Kwame Opam will be sounding off on each episode in a series of emails we’ll be publishing on the site. Warning: spoilers ahead.

After a season premiere all about Peter Capaldi finding himself as the new Doctor, “Into the Dalek” is his first true post-regeneration adventure. Or rather, it’s more of a parable: an outrageously weird story that serves to highlight a darker truth of the Doctor’s own soul. “The Doctor goes literally into his worst enemy to try and understand good and evil… and comes out learning about the good and evil in himself.”  It’s a great pitch for an episode that mostly pulls it off. Mostly.

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Apple reportedly reaches agreement with American Express for iPhone mobile payments

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Apple is widely expected to reveal a mobile payments system alongside the iPhone 6 at its press event on September 9th. The system — supposedly designed to take on Google Wallet, Isis, Paypal, and others — would allow you to use your phone to pay for items at the cash register, and it appears Apple’s gained a strong ally in its quest. Recode reports that American Express has agreed to “work together” with Apple on the rumored payments system.

The report, which cites sources familiar with the matter, does not go into the nature of the agreement. American Express is one of the major companies Apple will have to make partnerships with if it hopes to make a truly comprehensive and compelling alternative to traditional credit cards. The…

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Apple’s new spaceship is looking more like a landing site

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When it’s complete, Apple’s Campus 2 will resemble an enormous space disc descended upon the leafy suburbs of Cupertino, but as of today, it’s looking more like a dustbowl landing site. Still, just seeing the outline for the futuristic new headquarters is impressive, with the nearby blocks of housing giving a good sense of the grand scale at which Apple’s next home is being built. A GoPro-equipped DJI Phantom 2 drone has done an 8-minute aerial tour of the site, taking in a full 360-degree view of its surroundings and eventually descending for a closer look at the foundations presently being laid down.

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A spaceship in Cupertino: Apple’s journey to build a new headquarters

See the original posting on The Verge

Apple is a stupendously wealthy company, and it’s in the middle of building a new corporate headquarters befitting of that success. The Norman Foster-designed Campus 2 — commonly referred to as “The Spaceship” due to its distinctive circular design — will add 2,800,000 square feet of office space to the company’s Cupertino, California operations, and it will hold more than 12,000 employees. It will also be entirely powered by renewable energy, thanks to one of the largest solar arrays ever designed for a corporate campus. Apple co-founder Steve Jobs oversaw the building’s design before his death, but the campus has struggled to get off the ground. It’s reportedly $2 billion over budget and it’s been delayed by at least a year. It’s…

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Blogging History: NSA spied on Al Jazeera; Dick Cheney, proud torturer; Soros v “drug lord” accusation

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One year

Docs leaked by Snowden show NSA spied on Al Jazeera: “The US intelligence agency hacked into protected communication, a feat that was considered a particular success.”

Five years

Dick Cheney, proud torturer: Former US Vice President Dick Cheney proclaimed once again over the weekend that he believes torture applied to war-on-terror detainees in U.S.

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Charlie Shrem to plead guilty to federal charges related to Bitcoin transactions

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One of the most prominent names in Bitcoin will plead guilty to multiple federal charges in a New York court next Thursday, September 4th. According to Reuters, Charlie Shrem, an entrepreneur who’s made millions off of Bitcoin, has made a plea deal with authorities regarding charges that he illicitly transacted Bitcoin with users of the underground marketplace Silk Road. Shrem’s lawyer tells Reuters that he will plead guilty to the charge of unlicensed money transmission, which carries a maximum prison sentence of five years. He was also charged with one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering, and one count of willful failure to file a suspicious activity report with banking authorities. Combined, those charges carry an…

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The Road Ahead

See the original posting on Anandtech

Both of my parents were teachers, and for as long as I can remember they both encouraged me to do something in life that would help others. I figured being a doctor would be the most obvious way to do that, but growing up around a pair of teachers must’ve rubbed off on me. My venue wouldn’t be the classroom but rather the Internet. On April 26, 1997, armed with very little actual knowledge, I began to share what I had with the world on a little Geocities site named Anand’s Hardware Tech Page. Most of what I knew was wrong or poorly understood, but I was 14 years old at the time. Little did I know that I had nearly two decades ahead of me to fill in the blanks. I liked the idea of sharing knowledge online and the thought of building a resource where everyone who was interested in tech could find something helpful.

That’s the short story of how I started AnandTech. There’s a lot more to it involving an upgrade to the AMD K6, a PC consulting business I ran for 2 years prior and an appreciation for writing that I didn’t know I had – but that’s the gist.

I’m 32 now. The only things that’ve been more of a constant in my life than AnandTech are my parents. I’ve spent over half of my life learning about, testing, analyzing and covering technology. And I have to say, I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.

But after 17.5 years of digging, testing, analyzing and writing about the most interesting stuff in tech, it’s time for a change. This will be the last thing I write on AnandTech as I am officially retiring from the tech publishing world. Ryan Smith is taking over as Editor in Chief of AnandTech. Ryan has been working with us for nearly 10 years, he has a strong background in Computer Science and he’s been shadowing me quite closely for the past couple of years. I am fully confident in Ryan’s ability to carry the torch and pick up where I left off. We’ve grown the staff over the course of this year in anticipation of the move. With a bunch of new faces around AnandTech, all eager to uphold the high standards and unique approach to covering tech, I firmly believe the site can continue to thrive for years to come.

It’s important for me to stress two things: this isn’t a transition because of health or business issues. I am healthy and hope to be even more so now that I won’t be flying nearly 130,000 miles every year. The website and business are both extremely strong. We’ve expanded our staff this year to include a number of new faces contributing to both mobile and more traditional PC categories. Traffic is solid, we are looking forward to a bunch of very exciting launches especially in the final quarters of 2014. On the business side we continue an amazing run of being self sustaining, profitable and growing for every since year since 1997. We don’t talk about business affairs much on the site but we set a number of records in 2013 and expect that to continue. In other words, you don’t have to worry about the ability of the site to continue to operate.

Even though I’ve been doing this for nearly 18 years, we’ve evolved with the industry. AnandTech started as a site that primarily reviewed motherboards, then we added CPUs, video cards, cases, notebooks, Macs, smartphones, tablets and anything else that mattered. The site today is just as strong in coverage of new mobile devices as it is in our traditional PC component coverage and there’s a roadmap in place to continue to support both sides of the business. Our learnings in the PC component space helped us approach mobile the right way, and our learnings in the mobile space have helped us bring the PC enthusiast message to a broader audience than would’ve ever seen it before.

Over the past year I’ve transitioned many of my personal coverage areas to other ATers. Ian took over CPUs not too long ago and Josh has been flying solo with our mobile coverage for a bit now. Even the articles I helped co-author with Josh were 90% his. Kristian has more or less been running our entire SSD review program at AnandTech for a while now and he’s been doing a tremendous job. I remember editing one of his pieces and thinking wow, this kid knows more than me. In fact I’d go as far as to say that about all of our editors at this point. We’ve got a sea of specialists here and each one of them knows more than me about the area in which they cover. I’m beyond proud of them all and honored to have worked with them.

On a personal level I’ve made myself available to all AnandTech editors for advice and guidance, however I have fully removed myself from the editorial process. I can offer a suggestion on how to deal with a situation so long as describing the situation does not reveal any confidential information to me.

Thank You All

To everyone I worked with in the industry – thank you for the support and help over the years. You were my mentors. You showed kindness and support to a kid who just showed up one day. I learned from you and every last one of you influenced me at a very formative period in my life. The chance you all took on me, the opportunities, and education you provided all mean the world to me. You trusted me with your products, your engineers and your knowledge – thank you.

To Larry, Cara, Mike, Howard, Virginia, Hilary and the rest of the LMCD team that has supported (and continues to support) AnandTech for almost its entire life, I thank you for making all of this possible. I learned so much about the business side of this world from you all and it helped give me perspective and knowledge that I could have never gotten on my own. For those who don’t know them, the LMCD crew is responsible for the advertising side of AnandTech. They’ve made sure that the lights remained on and were instrumental in fueling some of our biggest growth spurts. 

To the AnandTech editors and staff, both present and past, you guys are awesome. You are easily some of the hardest working, most talented and passionate enthusiasts I’ve ever encountered. Your knowledge always humbles me and the effort that you’ve put into the site puts my own to shame. You’ve always been asked to do the best job possible under sometimes insane time constraints and you’ve always delivered. I know each and every one of you will have a bright future ahead of you. This is your ship to steer now and I couldn’t be happier with the crew.

To the millions of readers who have visited and supported me and the site over the past 17+ years, I owe you my deepest gratitude. You all enabled me to spend over half of my life learning more than I ever could have in any other position. The education I’ve received doing this job and the ability to serve you all with it is the most amazing gift anyone could ever ask for. You enabled me to get the education of a lifetime and I will never be able to repay you for that. Thank you.

I’ve always said that AnandTech is your site and I continue to believe that today. Your support, criticism and push to make us better is what allowed us to grow and succeed.

In the publishing world I always hear people talk about ignoring the comments to articles as a way of keeping sane. While I understood the premise, it’s not something I ever really followed or believed in. Some of the feedback can be harsh, but I do believe that it’s almost always because you expect more from us and want us to do better. That sort of free education and immediate response you all have provided me and the rest of the AnandTech team for years is invaluable. I’m beyond proud and honored by the AnandTech audience. I believe we have some of the most insightful readers I’ve ever encountered. It’s not just our interactions that I’m proud of, but literally every company that we work with recognizes the quality of the audience and the extreme influence you all exert on the market. You’re paid attention t

Cultural Realities Of Latin American Entrepreneurship

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8332215554_9a9f0d3474_o1 One of the brilliant things about tech leaders and pundits in Silicon Valley is their true passion for entrepreneurship and their belief in the power of the human spirit and intellect. Surrounded by the sight of so many motivated and talented founders in the Valley itself, they assume that this optimistic sensibility can override nearly any obstacle for a dedicated entrepreneur. Read More

Five Factors In Building Giants Of The Big Data Era

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giant-data As we enter the second half of 2014, it would be fair to say that big data has gone mainstream, attracting coffee table books, multiple industry landscapes, consumer applications, and large amounts of funding. Having seen many technology cycles during our 45 years in venture capital including the birth of the PC era, the transition to client-server computing, then Web-based computing, to… Read More

Former Teacher And Current Entrepreneur Walter Duncan Offers Advice On Getting Things Done

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In honor of back to school we’re talking to creatives, VCs, and, in this case, entrepreneurs about what it takes to succeed. Walter Duncan is a really nice guy and dedicated “teacherpreneur” who has created a test-taking app. His start-up has taken in hundreds of thousands in funding and the accolades from teachers are never-ending. We asked him what it took to be a… Read More

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