Watch Samsung announce the Galaxy S9 in 12 minutes

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After taking a year off from announcing its latest smartphone at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Samsung has returned this year to show off the new Galaxy S9. While the phone looks mostly the same, its interior has been upgraded with all the latest specs to bring users new camera modes, updated Bixby features, and a fingerprint scanner that’s placed… well, where it should have been in the first place. There’s also a new AR Emoji feature that’s supposed to take on Apple’s Animoji by creating a custom, movable emoji based on your face.

Watch all these features, and more, announced in our supercut of the one-hour long event, and be sure to follow The Verge all week as we bring you all the latest from MWC 2018.

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Riding through the rain on the ‘Model 3’ of motorcycles

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Zero has been occasionally described as the “Tesla of motorcycles,” and last year’s model DS ZF6.5 as the “Model 3 of motorcycles.” When you’re one of the only electric motorcycle manufacturers in the game, it’s frankly hard to avoid these comparisons. But after climbing aboard a DS ZF6.5 late last year, I got the sense that it wasn’t all just hot air.

It was a short ride, so the scope of these impressions is limited. Additionally, the proverbial ink of the “M” on my license was still so fresh that the excitement of showing it to people hadn’t worn off. Truly, all I wanted to get out of my first test ride of the DS ZF6.5 was a sense of what it feels like to slip through the city on a sleek, futuristic bike.

Of course, the day I rode was…

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Qualcomm’s simulated 5G tests shows how fast real-world speeds could actually be

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San Fransisco simulation results for 10th percentile of users

We’ve spent the last couple months hearing a lot about the kinds of speeds that 5G will theoretically be able to offer at its peak, but what about how the next-generation networks will work in actual, less than ideal real world conditions? That’s what Qualcomm is looking to answer with the 5G simulation tests it’s releasing at Mobile World Congress, and if the real world holds up anything close to the company’s simulations, then the future of mobile internet is going to be really, really fast.

Instead of just offering guesses as to the gigabit-plus speeds that 5G technology could one day offer, Qualcomm’s tests modeled real-world conditions in Frankfurt and San Fransisco, based on the location of existing cell sites and spectrum…

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Debugging with Serial Print at 5333333 Baud

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Debugging with printf is something [StorePeter] has always found super handy, and as a result he’s always been interested in tweaking the process for improvements. This kind of debugging usually has microcontrollers sending messages over a serial port, but in embedded development there isn’t always a hardware UART, or it might already be in use. His preferred method of avoiding those problems is to use a USB to Serial adapter and bit-bang the serial on the microcontroller side. It was during this process that it occurred to [StorePeter] that there was a lot of streamlining he could be doing, and …read more

The Verge Playlist: Damn, two years since Daniel

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As you may have heard, it has been two years since the Snapchat-turned-Twitter video “Damn, Daniel” changed the way we think about viral content, white sneakers, and Weezer.

If you haven’t heard, all you need to know is that two years ago, two boys became very famous for a short period of time — a period of time with ups and downs and baffling surprise twists — after one of them filmed the other one wearing a pair of white sneakers. Observing the white sneakers, he shouted, “Damn, Daniel! Back at it again with the white Vans.” It was silly, and it was good.

It was the subject of a Rolling Stone feature story in which Daniel’s longest response to any question was on the subject of learning to drive:

“I have a lot of friends that drive…

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These relaxing adventures are a peaceful getaway from the real world

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When people talk about escapism in video games, they usually mean huge, sprawling worlds you can get lost in. There are vast fantasy realms like in The Witcher, a post-apocalyptic wasteland of the Fallout series. The kinds of games you can play for dozens or hundreds of hours, losing an entire evening while the real world around you slips away. But who has time for that? Lately I’ve found myself searching for a different kind of escapism. Smaller spaces that don’t offer an entire world to explore — instead, they’re a brief getaway to calm my nerves.

Over the past week, two great examples of this have come out. One is the snowboarding adventure Alto’s Odyssey on the iPhone. An endless snowboarding game where the goal is ostensibly to rack…

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Watch how ILM created Star Wars: The Last Jedi’s opening space battle

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Star Wars: The Last Jedi scored a handful of Academy Award nominations this year, including one for best Visual Effects. As it did last year with Rogue One, Industrial Light and Magic has released a pair of behind-the-scenes clips that showcase how the film’s special effects came together.

The first clip shows off the film’s opening space battle, where Resistance starfighters go up against a First Order fleet. Director Rian Johnson used some practical hanger sets and an A-Wing fighter in the scene, around which animators composited their digital magic. They created the larger digital sets and spaceships in the scene, and layered in explosions and debris.

The second short clip shows off the creation of a First Order hanger that the…

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Why does my phone make it so hard to turn off Bluetooth?

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Lately, my phone really wants me to turn on Bluetooth. I only own one Bluetooth gadget (a UE Boom 2 I keep around my apartment) and I typically turn the antenna off when I’m not actively using it, but lately it’s been popping back on when I’m not looking. It’s a deliberate move by Apple: under iOS 11, turning Bluetooth off from the control center simply puts Bluetooth on time out until the next morning instead of disabling it permanently. Even when it’s off, the antenna stays on, looking for new devices. You can turn it all the way off by digging into the settings menu, but as soon as you turn it on for any reason, the cycle starts again. The assumption is that, between Apple’s AirPods, the Pencil, and other wireless gadgets, the average…

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CSS Steals Your Web Data

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Earlier this year, we posted a link to an interactive Web page. Most people seemed to like it, but we got at least one comment about how they would never be so incautious as to allow JavaScript to run on their computers. You can argue the relative merit of that statement, but it did remind us that just disabling JavaScript is no panacea when it comes to Internet security. You might wonder how you could steal data without scripting, assuming you don’t directly control the server or browser, of course. The answer is by using a cascading style sheet (CSS). …read more

The Nokia 8 Sirocco is a curved glass Android flagship with no headphone jack

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Nokia 8 Sirocco

HMD Global, the Finnish company that licensed the rights to produce Nokia phones, first revealed a Nokia-branded Android flagship back in August. At Mobile World Congress today, HMD is launching the Nokia 8 Sirocco, an upgraded variant that comes with some surprising design changes. HMD has opted for glass on 95 percent of the Nokia 8 Sirocco, with a tiny stainless-steel chassis than runs along the sides.

The result looks rather impressive, and the fingerprint reader has been moved to the rear to reduce the bezels at the front. The entire phone is curved towards wedge-like points at the edges, with a design that hides the usual ugly antenna lines. It feels small, light, and thin as a result of these changes, although the chamfered edges…

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The Nokia 1 joins Google’s Android Go effort with removable Xpress-on covers

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Google has been trying to re-engineer Android so it works better on lower-end devices. While Google has been attempting this for nearly four years with its Android One effort, the search giant rebranded with an Android Oreo “Go edition” for low-end phones back in December. Android Go is designed to run better on phones with 512MB or 1GB of RAM, thanks to OS tweaks and “Go” versions of popular Google apps.

This week at Mobile World Congress, we’re starting to see the first Android Go handsets. The Nokia 1 is one of the first, and it’s designed to be an entry-level smartphone for a number of emerging markets. The Nokia 1 specs are minimal, and it runs on a 1.1GHz MediaTek processor, 1GB of RAM, and just 8GB of storage. It’s a small and…

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Yes, the Samsung Galaxy S9 has a headphone jack

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Samsung officially announced the Galaxy S9 today, and yes, as indicated by previously leaked images, there is a headphone jack. While many companies have opted out of including a headphone jack — the iPhone X, Pixel 2, and Huawei Mate 10 Pro — some, like Samsung, have continued to include the headphone jack and be… just fine.

Sure, Samsung could have readily ditched the 3.5mm connector, but why? As said before, wireless audio is fine, not great. No one is asking for headphone jacks to be removed, and, “dongles are stupid, especially when they require other dongles,” as we’ve pointed out here at The Verge many times.

The thing is, headphone jacks work, period, and they’re extremely useful. Should we live without the headphone jack on…

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This is what Samsung’s Galaxy S9 costs on AT&T, Verizon, and T-Mobile

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Samsung just announced the Galaxy S9, and now we’re getting details on how much retailers and wireless carriers are going to charge for it. The cheapest way to get the phone (without a trade-in) is through Samsung itself. But pricing gets surprisingly more complicated when you bring in wireless carriers: AT&T and Verizon are charging extra, but they’re also offering trade-in discounts that can more than offset the price increase.

Here are the details we have so far — we’ll be updating with more info as it comes out. In all cases, preorders start March 2nd and sales start March 16th.

Samsung

Buy it outright: S9 for $719.99; S9 Plus for $839.99.

Monthly installments: $30 per month for 24 months for the S9; $35 per month for 24 months for…

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Samsung’s Galaxy S9 wants to turn the camera into a new home screen

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 The Galaxy S8 and S8+ already had one of the better smartphone cameras in the industry, and the Galaxy S9 and S9+ both seem to be top contenders to secure Samsung a place among the best options out there in 2018, too. But the most interesting thing about the camera might just be how central it is to the S9 and its launch. A home away from home(screen) Samsung is fully aware that people spend a… Read More

The Samsung Galaxy S9 arrives March 16 for $720, with AR emojis, real-time translation and a better camera

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 Samsung didn’t leave too much up to the imagination this time out. The hardware giant took a little wind out of its own sails back at CES when it announced it would be launching its latest flagship sometime this month. And then, of course, the invites went out, bearing a giant number “9.” Read More

With the Galaxy S9, Samsung put the fingerprint sensor where it belongs

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 The Samsung Galaxy S8 is a beautiful phone with a critical flaw. The fingerprint sensor is in the wrong damn spot. A phone is only as good as its usability and, to me, the S8 is crippled with its fingerprint sensor located off center. It drives me mad but Samsung finally righted the wrong with the S9. Samsung just announced the latest Galaxy phone and we spent some time with it. It’s… Read More

Samsung’s DeX docking station gets revamped, turning a smartphone into a trackpad

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 If you were having any doubts about Samsung’s commitment to its DeX, consider them assuaged. The company introduced its smartphone docking hardware with the Galaxy S8 and has talked up a new version for every big phone release since then — and today’s big Galaxy S9 reveal is no different. We were pretty lukewarm on the idea — or at least skeptical of how big a niche such… Read More

A ‘Black Panther’ moment

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 This week we’re bringing you a special edition of CTRL+T, the podcast that examines TechCrunch stories through a cultural lens. You might have heard that Marvel released a film called Black Panther last week and it saw near-record crowds descend on theaters all over the world. The CTRL+T podcast team was among them. We headed to Oakland on an unseasonably cold-for-California evening… Read More

Samsung’s AR Emoji taps creepy avatars and Disney characters to compete with Animoji

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 We’ve known for a while that Samsung’s been planning an Animoji competitor for its latest handset. Now that we’ve actually seen (the admittedly clunkily named) AR Emoji in action, we can testify to the fact that it’s some combination of compelling and creepy. That last part first. Like the iPhone X, the Galaxy S9 takes advantage of its on-board face scanning technology… Read More

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