Origins of Trump family fortune traced to Canada brothel during Gold Rush era

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Macleans reports: “Donald Trump’s grandfather opened this hotel during the Yukon gold rush, boasting ‘every delicacy in the market’ and ‘private rooms for ladies’”

Donald Trump’s grandfather Friedrich Trump operated a wild and crazy restaurant/bar/brothel in British Columbia during Canada’s gold rush era.

Bloomberg writer Natalie Obiko Pearson reports quite the story today on the origins of the Trump clan’s wealth in a late 19th-century subarctic outpost.

Portrait of Frederick Trump (Wikipedia)

Portrait of Frederick Trump (Wikipedia)


The Trump family’s gold-rush story began when Fred, as he was known, left Germany at the age of 16 with little more than a suitcase. He headed to New York to work as a barber before venturing west in search of riches. Following stints in Seattle and now-defunct Monte Cristo, the gold fever carried him to Bennett, where he and partner Ernest Levin built the Arctic Restaurant, which touted itself as the best-equipped in town.

It was open around the clock with “private boxes for ladies and parties,” according to an advertisement in the Dec. 9, 1899 edition of the Bennett Sun newspaper. The boxes typically included a bed and scale for weighing gold dust used to pay for “services,” according to a three-generational biography by Gwenda Blair, who traced the origins of the Trump family’s wealth. Of course, in the rough-and-tumble frontier towns of that era, the Arctic’s business model built on food, booze and sex was common.

The Arctic sat a stone’s throw from Bennett Lake in the heart of the township, amid a row of similar establishments and a sea of white canvas tents set up by prospectors. It was constructed of milled lumber and stocked fresh oysters, extravagant luxuries in a place where supplies were brought over arduous overland routes.

“I would advise respectable women travelling alone, or with an escort, to be careful in their selection of hotels at Bennett,” according to a letter penned by “The Pirate” in the Yukon Sun on April 17, 1900. For single men, the Arctic offered excellent accommodations but women should avoid it “as they are liable to hear that which would be repugnant to their feelings and uttered, too, by the depraved of their own sex.”


On this subject, Donald Trump previously told the New York Times that reports of prostitution at his grandfather’s lodging house and restaurant/bar are ‘totally false.’ Trump was born 28 years after the Yukon entrepreneur’s death.

The Bloomberg piece follows the footsteps of earlier original reporting at Canada news daily Macleans‘ feature, “Inside the wild Canadian past of the Trump family

“Before there was a Trump Tower, there was a gold-rush hotel in Bennett, Yukon, where the Trump family dynasty began,” Jason Markusoff reported earlier this month.


“Mining the miners was the smart thing to do,” Blair tells Maclean’s. “Where was the money to be made? It was to be made out of the guys doing the hard work, not out of the ground.” Prospectors were lucky to strike any gold, and luckier to escape the Arctic with any wealth; one of the other famed names to rise from the Klondike rush was Alexander Pantages, who started with a theatre in Dawson and would later launch a network that included Pantages theatres in Toronto and Winnipeg. The Guggenheims would find post-rush bounty with a company that dredged Klondike rivers, but already had family riches that the Trumps had yet to amass.

In Bennett came a warning about Trump and women, more than a century before Donald’s brags about groping women would echo through a presidential campaign.


Apple’s New MacBook Pro Requires a $25 Dongle To Charge Your iOS Device

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An anonymous reader quotes a report from Network World: As Phil Schiller explained during today’s event, Apple’s new MacBook Pros feature four Thunderbolt 3 USB Type-C ports, and conveniently, each of these can be used to charge the machine. Now, USB-C is incredibly versatile, and Apple will use the advanced port for power charging, HDMI and much more. However, with USB-C the only game in town, you might reasonably be wondering: How in the world do I connect my iPhone to my sleek new MacBook Pro? The frustrating answer is that you won’t be able to do so out of the box. Instead, you’ll have to buy a dongle. This is especially frustrating because many people use their notebooks for a) charging purposes when an outlet isn’t necessarily handy and b) for transferring photos and other data. Now, you might reasonably state that you can just rely upon the cloud for items like data transfer, but there’s no getting around the fact that Apple’s efforts in the cloud still leave much to be desired. How much will it cost to connect your iPhone to your brand new MacBook Pro? Well, Apple sells a USB-C to Lightning cable on its website for $25. While this is undoubtedly frustrating, we can’t say that it’s entirely unexpected given Apple gave us a preview of its preference for USB-C when it released its 12-in. MacBook last year. Still, it’s a funky design choice for a decidedly Pro-oriented device where the last thing a prospective consumer would want to do is spend some extra cash for a dongle after spending upwards of $2,399. Lastly, while we’re on the topic of ports, it’s worth noting that the new MacBook Pros also do away with the beloved MagSafe connector.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Apple Debuts New ‘TV’ Guide and Watchlist App For Apple TV, iPhone and iPad

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Even though the Apple TV news was considered “boring” by many livestream viewers waiting to catch a glimpse of the new MacBook Pros, there were several big announcements worth mentioning. For starters, Apple announced a new app called “TV” that will “allow you to track your favorite shows and movies across the video apps across the Apple TV platform.” What this app essentially does is showcase the content from video providers into a single view, making it easier for Apple TV owners to find content to watch. Apple TV owners will no longer need to search through a bunch of different apps to find the content they like. TechCrunch reports: When launched, the app will display a “Watch Now” section, where you can track the shows and movies you’re currently watching. Here, you’ll see things like how many minutes you have left on the movie or which season and episode you’re on in a series, for example. It will also alert you to new episodes from your favorite shows. From here, you can go into “Up Next” and “Recommended” sections, in order to find new things to watch from across favorite shows, movies, as well as iTunes purchases and rentals. In the “Recommended” section, content is organized into different groups, like trending shows and movies. And similar to iTunes, the TV app features curated “Collections,” which are thematic groupings of content, like political shows or thrillers, for instance. Other sections in the TV app, “Library” and “Store,” will point you to your prior iTunes purchases, including rentals, or let you browse for more movies and shows to buy. You can also use Siri with the new app, and the assistant is smart enough to know which app to launch to watch the program you ask about. For instance, if you want to watch the game, you just ask to watch the game — you don’t need to know which app is streaming it. You can also say things like “which games are on right now?” or “watch CBS News,” without having to navigate to the app directly. This feature, called Siri Live Tune-In, is available today. In addition, while the app is primarily meant to address the challenges of watching across apps on Apple TV, the new TV app will also arrive on iPhone and iPad this December, the company says. Along with the new TV guide app, Apple is rolling out support for Single Sign-On, which was announced at WWDC 2016 as a tvOS feature. This lets you enter your username and password for your pay TV subscription only once, instead of in each video streaming app that requires authentication.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

FCC Imposes ISP Privacy Rules and Takes Aim At Mandatory Arbitration

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An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: The Federal Communications Commission today imposed new privacy rules on Internet service providers, and the Commission said it has begun working on rules that could limit the use of mandatory arbitration clauses in the contracts customers sign with ISPs. The new privacy rules require ISPs to get opt-in consent from consumers before sharing Web browsing data and other private information with advertisers and other third parties. The rules apply both to home Internet service providers like Comcast and mobile data carriers like Verizon Wireless. The commission’s Democratic majority ensured the rules’ passage in a 3-2 vote, with Republicans dissenting. Democratic Commissioner Mignon Clyburn was disappointed that the rules passed today did not include any action on mandatory arbitration clauses that prevent consumers from suing ISPs. But Chairman Tom Wheeler said that issue will be addressed in a separate rule-making. In the case of privacy rules, the FCC passed the NPRM in March and the final rules today. Clyburn argued that the FCC could have imposed mandatory arbitration restrictions today, because the privacy NPRM sought public comment about whether to ban mandatory arbitration. Under the FCC rules, ISPs that want to share consumer data with third parties such as advertisers must obtain opt-in consent for the most sensitive information and give customers the ability to opt out of sharing less sensitive information. Here’s how the FCC describes the new opt-in and opt-out requirements: “Opt-in: ISPs are required to obtain affirmative ‘opt-in’ consent from consumers to use and share sensitive information. The rules specify categories of information that are considered sensitive, which include precise geo-location, financial information, health information, children’s information, Social Security numbers, Web browsing history, app usage history, and the content of communications.
Opt-out: ISPs would be allowed to use and share non-sensitive information unless a customer ‘opts-out.’ All other individually identifiable customer information — for example, e-mail address or service tier information — would be considered non-sensitive, and the use and sharing of that information would be subject to opt-out consent, consistent with consumer expectations. Exceptions to consent requirements: Customer consent is inferred for certain purposes specified in the statute, including the provision of broadband service or billing and collection. For the use of this information, no additional customer consent is required beyond the creation of the customer-ISP relationship.” ISPs must clearly notify customers about the types of information they collect, specify how they use and share the information, and identify the types of entities they share the information with.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

PurpleJS unites Java, JavaScript development

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Melding Java and JavaScript, PurpleJS is emerging as a framework for running lightweight JavaScript server applications without the complexity of the Node.js asynchronous programming model.

Atop the JVM (Java Virtual Machine), open source PurpleJS can be used when developers want to build multithreaded applications in JavaScript. It allows developers to run the same code in the browser and on the server, and it enables them to employ JavaScript while working with existing Java projects.

“PurpleJS is a simple and capable framework for creating performant web applications without leaving JavaScript,” main developer Sten Roger Sandvik said. “It’s created in Java to give the flexibility and performance Java provides.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

The Stars: The Definitive Guide to the Cosmos

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I’ve always been fascinated with the cosmos (who isn’t?), and I even once splurged for a telescope to put in the garden for my family to enjoy. But with only one college astronomy class (101) under my belt, my knowledge of the stars falls into the “Dummies” category. Which is why I loved DK’s new book, The Stars: The Definitive Visual Guide to the Cosmos.

Not that it’s only for dummies. The large 10.1 x 12.8 book is for astro newbies as well as the more seasoned who will enjoy the scenery and surely pick up some new stellar facts. It’s for teens as well as adults, jam-packed with starry science that falls into three sections. The first, “Understanding the Cosmos,” covers the basics and beyond, from the Big Bang, starbirth, supernovae and neutron stars to black holes, colliding galaxies, galaxy clusters and a lot more.

“Constellations,” the second and largest section, is loaded with the significance and charts of constellations – some popular ones (like those from the zodiac) as well as many I’d never heard of before (like Vulpecula the fox and Monoceros the unicorn). The third, smallest section of the book, “The Solar System,” just touches on our sun and planets, and was the one section that the authors could have expanded.

In true DK fashion, The Stars compliments its smart yet accessible text with a heavy dose of charts, maps, sidebars, and brilliant photos. The authors managed to make every page highly fresh and engaging.

The Stars: The Definitive Guide to the Cosmos

by DK

2016, 256 pages, 10.8 x 12.1 x 0.9 inches (hardcover)

$26 Buy a copy on Amazon

My $6 leather minimalist wallet is terrific

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I bought this leather wallet for $6 from Amazon a month ago. I liked it right away, and after having taken about eight flights since then, I have come to appreciate how great it is to be able to slide my driver license out of the clear plastic pocket (which has a hole so you can remove the card by sliding it with your thumb) and hand it to the friendly TSA officer at the security checkpoint.

The wallet shows no signs of wear, and the cards and cash are held tightly in the three different pockets (in addition to the driver license pocket) so they don’t fall out. It’s probably my favorite wallet, and the least expensive.

One of the pockets is advertised as RFID-blocking. I haven’t tested it, nor am I concerned about it.




Apple Unveils New MacBook Pro Featuring OLED Touch Bar, Touch ID – Powered By Intel Skylake Processor

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At an event on Thursday, Apple unveiled the new 2016 MacBook Pro. The redesigned MacBook Pro comes with “incredible extreme” all-metal body. The main attraction of the new MacBook Pro is an OLED touch strip at the top that Apple is calling the Touch Bar. The Touch Bar comes with a fingerprint scanner Touch ID that users can tap to log-in quickly to their computer as well as make online payments. The touch strip offers on-screen button that changes according to the application you’re running. Schiller, Apple SVP, said it was time Apple gotten rid of the dedicated function keys. The new MacBook Pro is thinner and lighter than the existing model, and it is powerful too. It comes in two screen sizes: 13-inch, which weighs 3 pounds and measures 14.9mm — down from 18mm from older MacBook Pro. The trackpad is larger too, Apple says, twice as larger than the older one. Also, it’s Force Touch trackpad. ArsTechnica adds: Both laptops are still recognizably MacBook Pros, but in keeping with Apple’s design priorities they’ve got slimmer profiles and smaller footprints. This is made possible in part by the move to USB Type-C ports like the one in the MacBook, all four of which support Thunderbolt 3. All four ports can be used to charge the system, too. Compared to the measly one port in the MacBook, the MacBook Pros are much more appealing to people who plug lots of stuff into their computers at once. Apple has also made the cowardly decision to retain the headset jack. Both systems include new Intel Skylake processors — dual-core chips in the 13-inch Pro and quad-core chips in the 15-inch model, just like before. The 13-inch Pros ship exclusively with Intel Iris 540 GPUs, while the 15-inch models ship with Polaris-based AMD Radeon graphics at the high-end.The 13-inch model MacBook Pro starts at $1,799, whereas the 15-inch model starts at $2,399.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Twitter is Shutting Down Its Video App Vine

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Twitter’s plan to refocus on its core business not only consists of laying off 9 percent of its staff, but also killing off Vine. The company announced today that it will shut down Vine’s video app in the coming months. From a Recode report: Vine has been struggling for some time, so Thursday’s move is surprising but not unbelievable. The app was never a revenue driver for the company, and it was no longer growing. Many of its top executives left over the spring and early summer. What’s interesting is that Twitter is shutting the app down instead of trying to sell it off. Or perhaps it did try and simply couldnâ(TM)t find a buyer. Either way, Vine will soon shut down. The company says that users will be able to download their Vine videos before that happens, but there has been no specific timetable announced. Vine general manager Hannah Davis, who just joined the company this spring, will stay on to oversee the transition, according to a spokesperson.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Colorado unfairly targeting wildlife refuge at swingers’ sex club, says squirrel-loving swinger proprietor

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Photo courtesy Kendall Seifert/Squirrel Creek Lodge

Kendall Seifert loves squirrels and swingers, and operates gathering places for both types of creatures at Squirrel Creek Lodge.

Seifert is 53, and operated a wildlife rescue center *and* a swingers club at the same site, until state authorities raided his Littleton, CO business in a fairly transparent attempt to throw a wet blanket on the sex stuff by way of targeting the squirrel stuff.


You can cancel your cable subscription thanks to this antenna—just $15.99

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TV antennas are making a comeback, and the Ghost Indoor HDTV antenna is a great example of why. Unlike the old bunny ear-style antennas, this compact antenna is barely noticeable and picks up channels easily.

Plus with the addition of streaming services like Netflix, we find ourselves with plenty to watch without a pricey monthly cable bill. 

The Ghost HDTV antenna receives HDTV and digital signals so you can tune into local, national, and regional TV. All you have to do is set it up with the included velcro patches, hook it up to the ANT IN port, and you’re ready to go.

The antenna is also slim and discreet, so it won’t destroy the look and feel of your home. In fact, one side of it is white, and the other is black, so you can better blend it with your house’s decor.

Right now the Ghost HDTV antenna is currently 57% off, and at $15.99, is cheaper than most monthly cable subscriptions. Order yours in the Boing Boing Store today.

Also explore the Best-Sellers on our network right now:

GifCities: a search engine for vintage GIFs

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The Internet Archive has a wonderful front-end: GifCities, a search engine for the myriad of GIFs that once graced legendary website hosting service Geocities. [via Andy Baio]

GifCities: The Geocities Animated Gif Search Engine was a special project of the Internet Archive done as part of our 20th Anniversary to highlight and celebrate fun aspects of the amazing history of the web as represented in the web archive and the Wayback Machine. Geocities was an early web hosting service, started in 1994 and acquired by Yahoo in 1999, with which users could create their own custom websites. The platform hosted over 38 million user-built pages and was at one time the third most visited site on the web. In 2009, Yahoo announced it was closing down the service, at which point the Internet Archive attempted to archive as much of the content as possible. … Mining this collection, we extracted over 4,500,000 animated GIFs (1,600,000 unique images) and then used the filenames and directory path text to build a best-effort “full text” search engine. Each GIF also links back to the original Geocities page on which it was embedded (and some of these pages are even more awesome than the GIFs).

If you’re just here for the under construction GIFs, here are all of them.

Ico and Shadow of the Colossus prints

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Ico and Shadow of the Colossus were beautiful, moody video games; games with a sense of place, of weird looming silences. Before gamers realized they didn’t want games to be art after all, these were the games they thought were art. And now, more than a decade on, you can finally get the legendary box paintings as gorgeous “giclee” prints. They’re expensive: $100 or so each. (more…)

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